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tv   CNN Newsroom  CNN  May 26, 2011 10:00am-12:00pm PDT

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oklahoma. >> find out more on how to help those devastated by the tornadoes, cnn.com/impact. there you're going to find all the groups, organizations and ways that you can help those who are in need. cnn.com/impact. "cnn newsroom" continues right now with randi kaye who's in for ali velshi. hey, randi. less than four weeks after this nation's greatest victory ever in the war against terror, three separate counterterrorism measures are about to e cannot the deadlines. two of the measures are in the post-9/11 patriot act from the intelligence reform and terrorism protection act of 2004. they'll fade into history at midnight, less than 11 hours from now, unless a renewal passes both houses of congress and is signed by president obama, who, by the way, is in france. and what are these critical tools as the director of national intelligence calls them? well, one is the roving wiretap. that allows investigators to.
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on potential plotters who use more than one phone or phone number or device with a single court order. also expiring is the power to seize "all considered relevant to a national security investigation." finally, the lone wolf provision allowing non-u.s. citizens who may be up to no good about who aren't connected with a foreign power or group. the you. a senate vote is hung up over civil liberties concerns. but democrats are s, harry reid complaining about the road blocks raised by tea party champion rand paul. listen to this. >> unless the senator foreign policy kentucky stops standing in the way, our law enforcement will no longer be able to use some of the most critical tools they need to counter terrorists and combat terrorism. if they cannot use these tools,
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tools that identify and track terror suspect, it could have dire consequences on our national security. >> i am somehow to be told that, because i believe a judge should sign a warrant that i'm in favor of terrorists having weapons? the absurdity of it. the insult of it. if one argues that judges should sign warrants before they go into the house of an alleged murderer? are you in favor of murder? >> now paul wants a series of amendments, one of which would exempt gun records from patriot act investigations. now here's where things stand. the senate voted this morning by a huge margin to cut off debate and move to a final vote. but under senate rules that can't happen for 30 hours, unless rand paul agrees and the deadline is 11 hours from now. we'll keep you posted. now to a high-profile murder trial in florida. there were some tense and heated moments today in the murder
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trial of casey anthony. as the defense questioned a key witness. casey anthony's father. the 25-year-old florida mom is accused of killing her 2-year-old daughter caylee nearly three years ago. let's get straight to what's happening right now in court. "people" magazine staff writer steve helling joins me by phone for orlando where he has been watching every moment of this case very closely. steve, casey's anthony, took the stand. he is a key witness, we know. the defense earlier this week accused him of sexually assaulting casey and says that he saw caylee fall into the pool. but anthony seemed at times a bit testy and denied a lot of claims made by the defense so what did we really learn from him on the stand today? >> well, the first thing we learned, which was interesting, was that there's no love lost between george anthony and casey's attorney, jose baez. they glared at each other the entire time. it was ugly, it was tense. but we didn't really learn much about what had happened on the day that caylee died.
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what we did hear was more about gas cans that casey allegedly stole. it was just -- it was fascinating but i don't know that it was all that revealing. >> sounds like drama but not a whole lot of information. as you mentioned those gas cans, the lawyers kept pressing george anthony about a gas can and the smell of casey's trunk. let's listen to what he said, and then we'll talk more about that. >> you actually were close enough to smell the trunk of that car. were you not? >> the only smell that i had was the smell of gas cans that were placed on the ground in front of me. >> and did you not smell any smell of human decomposition on june 24th of 2008 in the trunk of your daughter's car. >> did not. >> so steve, if you would, just help us understand why this is so significant. >> well, one thing about the gas cans that is so significant is that they had duct tape on them that is the same brand that they
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make and from the same batch as the duct tape that was found on caylee anthony's body. so that's a very good way to tie whoever had that duct tape and those gas cans to the murder. but then on top of it all, these gas cans were supposedly stolen from george anthony's shed during the time that caylee would have been dead and if she were in her mother's car, there would be a xhel of decomposition coming from the trunk. >> right. i know he told police at least that she was not real excited about him going near her trunk to get those gas cans. so the whole thing is really sort of mind boggling. we know casey's ex-boyfriend anthony lazzaro testified again today. prosecutors and the defense have offered very different portraits of casey. what did her ex say today that may have been important for jurors to hear? >> well, the most important thing is that casey anthony was spending all of her time with that ex-boyfriend during the time that caylee had
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disappeared. and if you believe the defense's story, just hours after caylee had drowned in the pool. and the one thing that the boyfriend anthony lazzaro had to say was that there was no indication with casey that anything was wrong. there was no mourning, there was no crying, there was no -- nothing like that. she seemed happy-go-lucky and she seemed like she was having a good time. >> how would you describe her emotion in court today? in the past few days she appeared quite emotional. how was she when her dad was on the stand. >> one thing i noticed, george anthony kept trying to look over at his daughter, he kept trying to catch her eye. if she looked over in her direction, she would look away. any body language expert can try and figure out what that means, but you know, obviously meeting her father's gaze is very, very uncomfortable for her right now. other than that, there's really no emotion. she's just -- she's almost
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catatonic in the way that she's just watching the proceedings happen. >> all right, steve helling from "people" magazine. steve, appreciate you calling in. thank you. >> thank you. we want to remind you of course that you can watch special coverage of casey anthony's trial all day on our sister network, hln. you can also count on naycy grace to bring you up to speed on all of today's developments tonight at 8:00 eastern on hln. it is back to the hospital for jared lee loughner now that a judge has ruled him mentally unfit to stand trial. he he's charged in the january mass shooting in tucson that killed six people and wounded 13 others, including congresswoman gabrielle giffords. he will remain in custody until he is stable enough for the trial to go forward. but what does that really mean? well, help us understand all of that. we want to bring in attorney and legal analyst lisa bloom. lisa, thanks for coming on today. for those of us who aren't lawyers, like yourself, explain to us why loughner cannot go to trial right away. >> well, simply put, we don't
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put mentally ill people on trial in the united states for proceedings when they're not able to assist in their defense. the judge found that both of those were true for jared loughner. he goes back to a mental health facility for at least another several months where he'll be treated. he may become medicated. he may advance in the treatment where he's at the point where he can assist in his defense and understand the proceedings against him. then he'll come back to court and perhaps be tried at that point. >> you've had a chance to look at the evidence that has been on the table against him. and then he acted out yesterday quite dramatically in court. is there a possibility at all here that he could be faking this? >> not really, randi. i'd like to say yes, by has a history and his history is that his mental illness seems to have been getting worse over the years. also, he denies that he's mentally ill. usually when people are faking it, they make a big show of their mental illness. it is exactly the opposite
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situation with jared loughner. >> so he'll go to what? a prison hospital. then is it possible that he'll never face a trial? i mean can he stay there indefinitely? >> it's possible. it really is possible. he seems to have a pretty advanced case of schizophrenia. however, schizophrenia is treatable and sometimes when people get into the hospital and they get treated, they can advance enough where they can be tried. that happened in the elizabeth smart case. it took many years but ultimately the defendants were tried in that case when they got to the point where they were sufficiently able to stand trial. >> so what does this mean? a lot of people are probably wondering what this means legally for his victims. will justice be served at all? >> you know, it's got to be so frustrating for the victims who are anxious for a trial to hear that he's not able to stand trial, although one victim did say, you don't have to be a psychiatrist to see that this guy is mentally ill. and if you aren't able to formt mens rea, as we call it in criminal law, criminal intent,
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we don't try you in this country. it is not that you just committed the act, you have to have the mental ability to understand what you were doing, to plan it, to have the intention to do what you did. he appears to be very far from that at this point, not able to stand trial. if he did stand trial he might be found not guilty by reason of insani insanity. so he goes back in the mental facility where he will stay potentially indefinitely. >> all right, lisa bloom helping us break that down, thank you. next, we'll go live to joplin, missouri, where an official list has just been released for those still unaccounted for following sunday's deadly twister. will this help erase some frustration? and the 100% natural whole grain oats can help lower your cholesterol. you are so sweet to me. bee happy. bee healthy.
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four days after that devastating tornado tore through joplin, missouri, state officials today released an official list of those who remain unaccounted for. 232 names are on that list. they are all individuals who from missing persons reports have been filled out. it includes some people who have died but haven't been positively identified. >> keeping in mind that on that list, there are individuals that we are working directly with their family members to identify and notify their loved ones that they are deceased. but they are also individuals on that list that we have not accounted for. so we are asking for your help and the public's help to account for those individuals.
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>> our brian todd was at today's news conference that you just saw there. he joins me live now from joplin. brian, will this help, do you think, some of the frustration that families have been going through? will it ease some of that? >> it may help, randi. but we've already noticed a problem with this list. i'm going to point it out to you right now. this involves a family who we've spoken to over the past couple of days. we've interviewed the mother of lance hare, a 16-year-old boy who went missing. she has filed a missing persons report. we've interviewed her, her father's been on -- i mean his father's been on cnn as well. her son appears to be on this list. but he may be on it twice. we literally just got this list and we went over it. there may be some problems with the list. he went by the name lance hare. kind of i guess a nickname. we were told that his given name is kaley hare. my photo journalist is going to see in.
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caley hare, age 16. then you flip the page, then his name is here, caley lance, age 16. this is his given name, that is his nickname but it is the same address, same age. he may be on here twice. we've counted this and this is 232. this is the official list of missing persons. but there may be problems. >> i'm curious, brian. because originally they said there might have been as many as 1,500 people missing, now we're down to 232. how did that happen? >> reporter: that's right. well, we asked specifically about that because that 1,500 number's been out there for a couple of days now. officials around here have told us on one hand that they want to dial back from that number because it was kind of unclear. on the other hand they wouldn't really give us a specific number. what they said today was that they had kind of a higher number because a lot of those were kind of loose rots, kind of anecdotal reports filed by family and friends such as someone calling
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in and saying well my uncle usually calls me on sunday and he didn't call me last sunday. things like that. just kind of loose information that's floating out there. phone calls an things like that. they had to cross reference all that information. they had to check it out in every way, shape or form, match it against the database. so they've whittled that down but they have also released -- this apparently now is a list of people who have been officially reported who they've contacted the family members, worked with the family members to get the information, the addresses, the ages. that's what they've come up with. so we've just shown you, there seems to be at least one problem with this list and a name who's on here twice. >> did you learn anything today at the press conference why so many of these families have been denied access to the morgue to try and find their loved ones? >> reporter: well, they say it is because they want to be 100% accurate. now there's a big point of contention there. because as we've been reporting, and others have, after the tsunami in sri lanka and in south asia, officials there took pictures of the bodies and they were at least able to show
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people pictures and there were positive i.d.s made there. here they won't even let people go into the morgue where they might have a possible match to let them identify the body. they say they want to do it forensically, dna, fingerprinting, establishing marks on the body that may be familiar, match it all forens forensically with the descriptions the families have given. there was a report early on this week that one dodd by was misidentified and mistakenly taken to a funeral home. they haven't talk about that, we specifically asked is that why they're doing it this way and they won't answer that question but it could be why -- there was some chaos and confusion and i guess real heartbreak over that one report. maybe they've pulled back and want to do it purely forensically right now and match data to data and data to description, things like that. that's the only answer i can come up for you there. >> sounds like sad and frustrating times in joplin, brian todd, appreciate it.
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thank you. in oklahoma a father's search for his 3-year-old son following a tornado there has come to a tragic end. >> we found my other son this morning, ryan. he was floating in the water on the west side of the lake. and i just want to thank everybody for helping and being there and it's a bad deal. i lost both of my boys. i was hoping we'd find ryan today alive. ryan was my little buddy. cole was two. i loved them both. i just want to thank everybody again for helping, all they've done. thanks. >> a heartbreaking story there. officials say ryan hamill was separated from his family when the storm hit tuesday night. his mother who was pregnant and
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5-year-old sister survived but his 15-month-old brother also died. the father had been out of town. to find out more how you can help those devastated by the tornadoes, go to cnn.com/impact. right there you will find all the organizations and many ways that you can help those in need. cnn.com/impact. we'll be right back. w extra-strh bayer advanced aspirin. it has microparticles so it enters the bloodstream faster and rushes relief right to the site of your tough pain. ♪ in fact, it's clinically proven to relieve pain twice as fast. new bayer advanced aspirin. extra strength pain relief, twice as fast. that's really good! it tastes good, so there can't be fiber in it! it's actually got about half a day's worth of fiber. [ fiber seeker ] really? try it. [ mr. mehta ] honey, touch of brown sugar, crunchy clusters -- any cardboard? [ male announcer ] cardboard no, delicious yes.
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it looks as though we still have a few years before the
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housing market fully rebounds, this according to a krrecent re from realtytrack because of foreclosures. it is keeps home prices overall low. look at this graph. foreclosures represent over half of home sales in nevada at 53%. arizona and california don't seem to fare much better, 45% of homes being in foreclosure. overall in the u.s. 20% of all home sales are foreclosures. great for those looking for deal but not something helping the market overall. there's no doubt that the fortune 500 list of ceos is full of the best and brightest in business today. so how many women ceos made the list this year? there are 12 female ceos on the list, down from 15 last year. so let's take a look at a few who made the cut. ang ga braly of wellpoint insurance named ceo in 2007. general counsel chief public
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affairs officer and even executive vice president. shareholders were rewarded with a 25% quarterly dividend, the first ever. kravrt ceo irene rosenfeld raised a few eyebrows when she pushed ahead with a plan to buy bridish cad bury for $19 billion, a move that wasn't encouraged by one of its more notable shareholders, warren buffett. buffett sold some stock off but plenty of others rose in and kraft shares rose almost 16% in 2010 kraft now holding the title of world's largest confectioner. ellen kullman has made bold moves that could pay off big for dupont in the future. she completed a $6 million
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acquisition. for the rest of the list as well as other great money stories, check out the all-new cnnmoney.com. join christine romans for your bottom line saturday morning 9:30 eastern and savannah your money at 3:00. let's update our top stories. key provisions of the patriot act could expire at midnight if congress doesn't pass a four-year extension. it is caught up in procedural wrangling right now in the senate and still has to go before the house if senators pass it. the expiring provisions of the antiterrorism law deal with roving wiretaps, tracking alleged lone wolf terrorists and allowing authorities to obtain any records they deem relevant to an investigation. the supreme court sides with arizona on a law punishing businesses that knowingly hire illegal immigrants. in a 5-3 ruling, the justices rejected arguments that the arizona law steps on traditional
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federal oversight over immigration. challenges to a more controversial law that would give police a greater role in arresting suspected illegal immigrants are working their way through lower courts. former international monetary fund chief dominique strauss-khan is now living in a luxury town house in new york's trendy tribeca neighborhood. he's under house arrest awaiting his trial for raping a hole tell maid. a real estate listing says the town house is nearly 7,000 square feet with rent listed at $60,000 a month. what a deal. president obama is comparing notes and talking policy with world leaders in france. what does this mean for americans at home? ed henry will tell us right after the break. so keep it here. we're adding new cell sites... increasing network capacity, and investing billions of dollars to improve your wireless network experience. from a single phone call to the most advanced data download, we're covering more people in more places than ever before
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major news from overseas. police in serbia have arrested a man suspected of being the highest ranking war crimes suspect still at large from the balkan wars. senior white house correspondent ed henry joins me from france where president obama is participating in the g-8 talks. ed, first i want to ask you, any reaction from the white house about this big arrest? >> yeah. the president just put out a written statement a few minutes ago saying he is looking forward to mladic being transferred to the haig very quickly so he'll be brought to justice. he says he thinks this could give the many, many thousands of families affected by this genocide at least some measure
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of justice. this news came in just as the president was having a bilateral meeting with president medvedev in which we're told president medvedev congratulated president obama for killing osama bin laden. who would have thought in the space of three weeks these two cold-blooded killers would be captured and killed. pretty remarkable. >> let's get back to the g-8 talks plp anything that's actually going to happen there at these talks impact americans? if so, what? >> reporter: well, the dirty little secret is there's not too much action here. it is often a lot of talk. what i've learned at these summits is what happens on the sidelines, instead of what we're seeing in sort of the carefully crafted photo-ops can often be more important. for example that meeting i mentioned with the russian president. president obama had a chance, because at these summits you get a chance to spend some quality time with your counterparts on the sidelines and he was able to talk to him about afghanistan.
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russia's very helpful in moving equipment, for example, for the afghan war to help the u.s. also about libya. this is the first time the president's been able to get a whole bunch of allies together in one place to talk about what's next there. colonel gadhafi is obviously dug in. this is of great interest. when you ask how does it impact the american people back home. because president obama has made clear on this trip that maybe this has taken a bit longer than some people expected and that basically there's going to need to be some patience not just among allies here but among american people back home that this may drag on for some time. >> so it sounds like there is some work going on. but you understand there were a couple of funny moments from the internet session today? >> they have these little breakout sessions. they had one on the internet, a big priority of president sarkozy hosting the summit in france. he had mark zum ckerburg from facebook and eric schmidt from google. white house staff noticed right
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behind where president obama was sitting at this big table there were a couple of big large fax machines, like circa 1988 or something. so the white house staff had them moved out because they thought the photo of president obama talking about the internet with mark zuckerburg and others with some old dated fax machines probably would have been lamb popped by jon stewart and others. another thing, angela merkel was going on and on about how apparently she loved the social network, the movie. and she asked president sarkozy. he seemed to agree and she apparently didn't realize that not the entire movie was something that mark zuckerburg really enjoyed. not the entire story about some of his old roommates, et cetera, his classmates at harvard. she asked zuckerburg whether he enjoyed it. he said i didn't really enjoy it actually. then she said something like maybe you'll enjoy the next one. i didn't know there was a sequel
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involved. >> i'm just curious because you get all the plum assignments, traveling to the president all over the world. kind of looks like you're on a racetrack. >> i am on a racetrack. there are no horses here. bottom line is that this is apparently deauville. it's been known over the years as a playground for the rich. so there's a racetrack here. there are some beaches nearby. but, yeah, i want to clear it up. we're not at the track betting on any horses. >> it certainly looks like you are. >> but we don't have any time. you keep asking me to come back live. i was going to try to take the segment off today but they said you needed me. >> we always need you, ed henry. i'll let you get back to the races now. place a bet for me. we'll be right back with much more news. panels that harness the sun's energy... working on social activities like clean up programs on beaches in many locations... and regional replanting activities
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let's check on the latest from the casey anthony murder trial. jurors just got back from lunch after hearing from kayny's father. the defense argues george anthony sexually abused his granddaughter and say caylee drown in a swimming pool but prosecutors are arguing he knew nothing about caylee's death. >> on june 24th of 2008 did you you believe that your granddaughter was alive and well and being cared for by your daughter? >> yes. >> did you have any reason on june 24th to suspect that your granddaughter was either dead or missing? >> no. >> casey anthony's ex-boyfriend
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briefly returned to the stand again today. when asked how casey was with caylee, her daughter, he described casey as an affectionate mother. several key anti-terror measures could expire at midnight if congress can't pass a four-year extension. it is caught up in procedural wrangling right now in the senate and still has to go before the house if senators manage to pass it. the expiring provisions deal with roving wiretaps tracking alleged lone wolf terrorists and allowing authorities to obtain any records they deem relevant. a list of missing people are 232 names published on missouri's public safety department website. list only includes those whose families filled out a missing persons report. there is a sense of desperation from families trying to find their loved ones. one father cannot stop making calls to his missing son's cell phone. >> does it ring or -- >> it rang for the first day and half, now it goes straight to voice mail.
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but just in case he gets it, i want him to know that his dad loves him. >> reporter: the public safety deputy director says some people on the missing list may be dead and officials will work with families to help identify them. the death toll now at 125. u.s. economic growth remained disappointingly weak the first three months of the year. the latest government data shows the gross domestic product grew 1.8% in the first quarter. that's unchanged from the initial report a month ago. many economists were expecting that number to be revised a little higher. the gdp is the broadest measure of the nation's economic health. delivering a blow to wisconsin governor scott walker. his controversial law has been struck down. it restricts collective bargaining. the supreme court ruled it violates the state's open meetings law and failed to provide the public enough notice before passing the measure. the ruling renders the law void but this decision is not the end to the legal fight. the state supreme court is scheduled to hear arguments in june to determine whether it
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will consider the case. many young adults may look healthy but they could be walking around with high blood pressure and not even know it. our dr. sanjay gupta looks at what's behind this increase. that story is next.
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many young adults may have high blood pressure and they don't even know about it. a new study finds nearly 20% of young adults suffer from higher blood pressure. the number is much higher than previously thought. our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta explains why it is vital for young people to improve their health.
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>> randi, this study is unique, the first of its kind really to follow 14,000 young people starting when they were teenagers, follow them into early adulthood and found 0% of them had hypertension. almost half of them had no idea that they had it. that was the real headline here concerning one for sure. i think we're seeing some ramifications of the childhood obesity epidemic. children are starting to grow up and starting to develop higher tension as a very young age, too young in many ways. you also have a peer of time where they go from the activity of adolescents to this period of time where they're slower in terms of their activity and starting to make some poorer dietary choices. is all preadulthood and you start to see some of the health consequences of that. hypertension is, when the blood surges through the blood vessel, you get a surge in pressure and
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relaxation. sis tollic should be 1 0, die diastolic. i remember saints over demons to keep that straight. guidelines suggest people should have their blood pressure check starting around 18 years old but a lot of people don't. a simple, noninvasive test. just use a blood pressure cuff. these are the young invincibles. they often don't keep that in mind. you get specific tips how to address this. exercise, good diet, but let me focus just on sodium which is related to high blood pressure. it is hidden everywhere. you should get 2,000 milligrams a day. this has more than 400 milligrams. a fifth of your entire's day worth in one small glass of tomato soup chicken noodle soup can have half of your daily requirements.
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how are these foods preserved? sodium. that's how they have such a long shelf life. you got to keep tabs. but starting at 18 get your blood pressure checked to help reduce the development of this big killer, heart disease, as you get older. >> thank you, sanjay. the accused mastermind of the massacre of 8,000 people no longer a free man. the dramatic capture of former bosnia serb general rocco mladic right after. ♪
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he was one of the world's most wanted criminals and on the run for more than 15 years. but no more. president of serbia announced today the capture of former bosnian serb general ratko mladic. he is accused of ordering the worst massacre since world war ii. some 8,000 muslim men and boys slaughtered in the nuunited nations protective enclave in 1995. mladic's forces shelled the town for five days before entering. witnesses say they saw him order his soldiers to round up victims. he commanded the 3 1/2 year sage of sarajevo in 1992, after the bosnian majority voted to break away from ewiyugoslavia.
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his actions resulted in the deaths of thousands of people and children. he's been indicted. nic robertson joins us now by phone from tunisia. first tell me your reaction to his capture. >> reporter: it's taken a long time. it seemed inevitable that he would caught up but eventually the political -- there was an alleged strain of government there. i'm not surprised. it has taken a hugely long time to catch up with him but it seemed inevitable. but for all the victims in bosnia today, it has to be a day they feel better. >> how do you think mladic managed to evade capture for 15 years? did he have help, you think? >> reporter: he certainly did. i remember in 2006, 2007, we had a tip-off that he was living in a house just --
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>> all right, we seem to have lost nic robertson there. i was trying to bring us a report by phone. we'll try to bring him back as the show goes on. 45 minutes past the hour. time for a check of our top stories. there is growing concern that yemen is on the verge of civil war. in the capital at least 28 people were killed today in an explosion the government blames on a rebel tried. more than 50 people were killed overnight in clashes between the anti-government tribe and security forces. the u.s. has ordered all non-essential diplomats and family members to leave the country. yemen is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. in pakistan, another suicide bombing has killed at least 5 people in a northwestern part of the country. the pakistan taliban has claimed tont responsibili responsibility saying it was part of a series of attacks to avenge the killing of osama bin laden. a similar suicide bombing yesterday killed several police
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officers. also the government has ordered the u.s. to reduce by half the 200 military trainers now in the country. and china finally confirming the visit of north korean leader kim jong-il. state run media says he met with chinese leaders and received beijing's renewed support. the visit comes as north korea faces an economic crisis and increasing isolation over its nuclear program. kim was quoted as saying he wanted to resume nuclear disarmament talks. well, bee venom and explosive detection. not two things that you think would normally go together. right? we'll explain how they do go together and how this all works together next in today's "big i."of hat i couldn't do. ♪ the accident could have been my excuse to quit. i made it my reason to go even harder. ♪ [ male announcer ] helping people achieve without limits. at the hartford it's what we do... and why we're the founding partner
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welcome back. so tomorrow, bees are an annoyance or some cases those allergic it might be a threat to your health. but what if i told you the bee venom that many of us fear can now be used to help detect explosives? it's not quite that simple, but to help us break it down is associate professor of chemical engineering at m.i. t. this is fascinating. how did you discover this and how does it actually work? >> thank you, randi.
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we discovered this by accident. we were -- we're very interested in how molecules absorb to a special class of nano material called carbon nanotubes and we discovered there are a series of peptides in bee venom that can actually recognize and bind to an important class of chemicals called nitro aromatics, things that comprise common pesticides and explosives. so we found that these peptides, what will bind and change shape in response to these different types of molecules. when we take these peptides and attach them to a -- to a carbon nanotube we make a special sensor, a fluoresorescent senso like a tiny flashlight, that can turn off and on in response to a particular explosive or pesticide that you're trying to measure. >> what kind of explosives can
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it detect? >> so it can detect -- we're st still discovering this, looking lieu the library of materials but detect common ones, tnt, rdx. but it can differentiate molecules that have the groups that seem to be the signature for some common types of explosives. so it's -- there's a large library of molecules that you can measure in this way. >> how does this differ, would you say, from current explosives detection devices? >> it differs in that this is a nano meter sized transdeucer and -- >> what is that exactly? >> well, it's -- the size of this sensor is about 30,000 times smaller than the thickness of your hair. and this is a class of sensors that are being produced across a scientific field called nan to
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technolo technology. one of the hallmarks we can lower the detection u nitd for this sensor down to single molecules. these are sensors that can actually detect as few as a single collection or handful of molecules. so that's going to have wide ranging impacts on analytical science. >> how do you see this being used day-to-day? >> well, what i would like, personally, is that i would like to -- i would like to create very inexpensive, cheap, affordable sensors that can be distributed ubiquitously. you can have in your smartphone, you can have sensors that can give you information about the chemicals that are in your environment. we could network that information together and learn things collectively, but also if you're interested, i think empowering citizens to be scientists and and of themselves
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is a worthy goal. >> impressive. >> you might be interested in what kind of pesticide residues are on your food, for example. >> that's very cool. professor, thank you so much. i learned a lot of new words. my favorite the nano mitter size transdeucer. i'm going to look that up later. thank you. i got most of what you said, i think. >> thank you, randi. for more information, visit cnn.com/ali. so, is sarah palin getting closer to tossing her hat into the ring? cnn's mark preston will read the tea leaves for us after the break.
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mark preston joins me from washington. sarah palin is giving signs that she might be interested in running for president. i know you're working on a piece on this that explores the subject. what do you think? >> i am, randi. first, something that has come in that is probably going to give a lot more credence to the idea that sarah palin is, in fact, seriously considering running for president. reporting right now that sarah palin plans to embark on a nationwide tour. it's called the one nation tour,
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going to start this weekend here in washington, d.c. it's going to come right around the annual pilgrim age of bikers who come to washington, d.c. to honor fallen soldiers and prisoners of war. from there, we're told that sarah palin will be visiting historical site as long the east coast. as you said, i am working on a story right now, analysis piece, looking at whether sarah palin is very serious about running for president. what we do know is that she has actually indicated that she's not going to close the door to it from her perch over at fox news where she's a paid contributor, sarah palin still has fire in the belly. we also do know that sarah palin is starting to build out a campaign operation which in the past has been very small. randi, sarah palin, who hasn't really taken too many steps forward that would indicate that she is running for president is, in fact, taking those steps now. >> i mean, most of the spring she seemed to be quiet, watching from the sidelines. and now, all of a sudden, boom.
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what do the polls say about a potential palin run? >> reporter: she continues to do well in the national polls including the gallup poll that showed that sarah palin comes in second place now. polls are early, but if you look at that, she's only two percentage point behind mitt romney, considered the front-runner. this poll, of course, excludes mike huckabee and mitch daniels, two candidates seen by those in the gop establishment as well as a social conservative community as very serious candidates and very good candidates. should sarah palin decide to run, she would be reaching out to social conservative voters to gain their support. is a potential problem for sarah palin. i got off the phone with tony perkins, a very powerful organization said one of the problems for sarah palin is that michele bachmann, the minnesota congresswoman, she is starting to take up a lot of that oxygen
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that sarah palin once owned. michele bachmann is a very conservative, she's very good in social conservative issues, and that could be potentially a problem for sarah palin, should she run for the republican nomination. >> mark preston, interesting stuff. look forward to your analysis piece on this. next update from the best political team on television is an hour away. we want to start this hour with the high-profile murder trial of casey anthony out of florida. new details are riveting, and there were tense and heated moments as the defense questioned a key witness, casey anthony's father. the 25-year-old florida mom accused of killing her 2-year-old daughter caylee nearly three years ago. straight to what's happening in court now. legal analysts sunny hostin of "in session" is watching the case closely and joins me from new york. on the stand another ex-boyfriend of casey's who took a picture of caylee who clearly had bruises on her face. we'll get to them, though, more in a moment. but first, i want to talk about
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casey's dad, george anthony. he's a key witness, an important part of the defense's argument to explain casey's behavior. on the stand today he didn't look happy. what did we learn from him? >> he was very, very combat in, and i think whaile we didn't learn much about him about the facts of the case we learned a lot about his demeanor in the courtroom. he accused jose baez of badgering him, trying to get him angry. he also said some things like if you respect me, i'll respect you. it was really something that you often don't see from a witness usually witnesses during cross-examination don't battle like that. and so i will say that the defense is trying to paint him out to be this abusive, controlling figure in the anthony household, and my view, he really made that picture seem a little more clearer on the witness stand. his behavior on the witness stand told a lot, and perhaps may have helped the defense. >> and i know that lawyers did,
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they certainly kept pressing george anthony about the gas can and the smell of casey anthony's trunk. let's listen to what he said and i want to ask you a question about it. >> you actually were close enough to smell the trunk of that car, were you not? >> the only smell i had of smelled gas cans and they were placed on the ground in front of me. >> you did not smell any smell of human decomposition june 24th of 2008 in the trunk of your daughter's car? >> i did not. >> now, tying these gas cans, sunny, to casey anthony is significant. can you help explain why? >> well, it certainly is significant because the prosecution is alleging that she kept caylee anthony's body in the trunk of the car and that everybody talked about the smell of death emanating from that car. some are saying gasoline perhaps would mask that smell. others are saying things like, perhaps she ran out of gas, as
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some 20-something-year-old often do. the gas cans, there was a piece of duct tape found on the gas can and one of the prosecution's theories is that duct tape was placed by casey anthony around the face of little caylee anthony, thus suffocating her. so for various reasons these gas cans are very important and crucial to the prosecution's case. >> certainly sounds that way. prosecutors and defense have offered different portraits of casey. her ex-boyfriend, anthony lazzaro described her as an anext nate mom to caylee. there was a picture the jurors saw of caylee with a bruise to her face, which i mentioned earlier. can you talk to me about that picture and what his testimony actually added to it? >> well, there was a picture taken that he took of casey anthony and caylee in his apartment, apparently they spent a lot of time there, even spending the night in the same bed with ricardo morales when
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they were dating each other, and the defense and the prosecution discussed this picture pretrial because there's a little bruise on her face. we know casey anthony has been charged with aggravated child abuse. the defense doesn't want these jurors to think that somehow casey anthony struck her daughter, the judge is supposed to give the jury an instruction about that bruise. that hasn't happened yet, but it really is a very damaging picture without explanation to this jury because, again, there's a big bruise on her face. casey anthony, and i believe ricardo morales says that happened because caylee ran into a table. it is out there for the jury and also let me mention this, the shirt that she's wearing in the picture, little caylee, that is the shirt that was found on her remains. >> i couldn't help but notice, though, casey's father, getting back to him for a moment he was looking at his daughter during this testimony and casey was
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avoiding eye contact with him. when jurors see this play out, this family drama, how does this go observe with them? >> you know, we know from statistics and from studies that jurors watch defendants very carefully to try to read emotion as to what's going on in the courtroom. i think it can be read a couple of ways. it can be read in favor of the defense that she's afraid of her father and that he sexually abused her. he's still in control of her. for the prosecution, however perhaps it can be red in the prosecution's favor, maybe she's ashamed of the fact that she's falsely accusing him of sexual abuse. all in all, we do know, though, randi, this jury is riveted by all of the testimony and has been watching casey anthony intently all morning and day long. >> sunny, very interested case. we want to remind you, watch special coverage of casey anthony's trial all day on hln. count on nancy grace to bring you up to speed on all of today's developments tonight at
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8:00 eastern on hln. sunny, i believe you're still with us. i want to turn our attention to jared loughner, charged, as we know in the january mass shooting in tucson that killed six people and wounded 13 others, including congresswoman gabrielle giffords. he's going to remain in custody until stable enougher to the trial to go forward. but what does this really mean? the judge set a control date of september 21st. the u.s. attorney in arizona says they are convinced that he can be made competent in about four months. it could mean when they go back to court, he will have been treated with some sort of medication and received counselling and that he will be found to be competent at that point. it could also mean, randi, he still remains incompetent to stand trial and you know, unfortunately, for the prosecution and for the victims, that is something that has happened before in other cases where there are people, 12, 15
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years down the line, still incompetent to stand trial for the crimes that he have allegedly committed. >> so what would happen? he would remain in a prison hospital? >> that's right. he would be -- he could would remain in a federal institution until he became competent, if ever. >> is there a possibility -- we've talked about the case many times, when you look at him and the evidence against him, some of is it flat-out bizarre and you have his breakdown in court yesterday, do you think there's any possibility at all that he's faking it? >> of course, randi, you're right, we've talked about this off and on camera. i don't think there's any evidence that he is malingering, no evidence whatsoever. many people have said that he -- there was a steep decline in his mental health over the past two to three years. that is consistent with people suffering, especially men from paranoid schizophrenia, the onset is early 20s, late teens.
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the time line is appropriate. no indication of malingering. court psychiatrist and psychologi psychologist, one independent, found he was suffering from paranoid schizophrenia. >> is something like this a blow to prosecutors? they don't have him behind bars. does this feel like a failure, as a prosecutor, or was the most important thing to just have him put away somewhere? >> well, you know, prosecutors certainly want justice. with a case like this we know about congresswoman giffords and her life changes forever, six dead victims including a federal judge, prosecutors certainly want justice and that's why i think we're hearing from the u.s. attorney in arizona they are convinced that he can be made competent. but you know, being away from the general public and not being able to harm anyone else, it is something that i think a prosecutor would consider as well. >> all right. sunny hostin, thanks for weighing in on both those important cases that we're watching.
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thank you. to washington, less than four weeks after this nation's greatest victory in the war against terror, three separate counterterrorism measures are just about to expire. two are in the post 9/11 patriot act, the other comes from the intelligence reform and terrorism protection act of 2004. they will fade into history midnight, less than ten hours from now, unless a renewal passes both houses of congress and signed by president obama, who by the way is in france. what are these critical tools as the director of national intelligence calls them? one the roving wiretap, allows investigators to eavesdrop with a single court order on suspects who use multiple phones or phone numbers. also expiring is the power to seize, quote, any tangible thing considered relevant to a national security investigation. finally, the lone wolf provision, allowing surveillance of nonu.s. citizens who may be up to no good but aren't connected with a power or group.
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a vote is hung up over civil liberties concerns but democrats aren't the ones raising them, at least not complaining the loudest. instead, majority leader harry reid is complaining about the roadblocks raised by republican freshman and tea party champion, rand paul. take a listen to this. >> the senator from kentucky stops standing in the way, our law enforcement will no longer be able to use the most critical tools they need to counter terrorists and combat terrorism. if they cannot use the tools, tools that identify and track terror suspects it could have dire consequences on national security. >> i am somehow to be told that, because i believe a judge should sign a warrant, that i'm in favor of terrorists having weapons? the absurdity of it, the insult of it. if one argues that judges should sign warrants before they go into the house of an alleged murderer, are you in favor of
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murder? >> paul wants a series of amendments, one of which would exempt gun records from patriot act investigations. here is where things stand. the senate voted this morning by huge margin to cut off debate and move to a final vote. under senate rules that can't happen for 30 hours unless paul agrees. the deadline, remember, continue hours away. we will keep you posted on where this goes. sound effect today is a daughter's heartfelt defense of her scandalized mother. the tv network telemundo spoke with jackie roso whose mother mildr mildred baena is schwarzenegger's housekeeper. we've gotten plenty of details. rsos says we don't know mildred baena. >> doesn't matter what any newspaper says or anything because, you know, i know my mom and, you know, her friends and
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her family, we all know her. we know the mildred. so the mildred that they put out there, it's like -- it's just, you know gossip, rumors. >> rozo says her mom is an inspiration, and her brother, quote, knows that i love him, i'm his family and i'm always there with him. that is what she said. a new list is out today on those still missing in missouri following sunday's deadly tornado. but the list is not without problems. that is just ahead.r in 2011, &t is at work, building up our wireless network all across america. we're adding new cell sites... increasing network capacity, and investing billions of dollars to improve your wireless network experience. from a single phone call to the most advanced data download, we're covering more people in more places than ever before in an effort to give you the best network possible. at&t. rethink possible.
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this just in, president barack obama will nominate general martin dempsey, the army chief of staff, to be the next chairman of the join chiefs of staff. several administration officials say the current chairman admiral mike mullen's term is ending in september. officials warned, since it has not been officially announced, there is a chance the president could change his mind. the white house and pentagon declined to comment on the nomination. four days after that devastating tornado tore through jopl joplin, missouri, state officials released an official list of those who remain unaccounted for. 232 names are on that list. they're all people for whom missing person reports have been filed. it includes some who have died but haven't been positively identify. >> keeping in mind on that list there are individuals that we
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are working directly with their family members to identify and notify their loved ones that they are deceased. there are also individuals on the list we have not accounted for, so we're asking for your help and the public's help to account for those individuals. >> the new list comes amid mounting frustration from victims' family members. part of it has to do with a holdup at the morgue. joining me by phone, coroner mark bridges. thanks for your time today. i'm hoping that you can help us understand and get us an answer on this, why aren't families being allowed into the morgue from where we sit? it seems like that would speed things up. >> hello. yes. the situation that we have in our temporary morgue is that we have 125-plus bodies approximately 125-plus bodies
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that are in temporary refrigeration. and we have to wait for a federal -- we have had to wait for a federal team to set up, they had to fly them in from all observe the united states. they have $2 million worth of equipment. now they're set up and functioning so they can i.d. these individuals. they have a few out yesterday. they're hoping to start to get 19-plus out per day from here on in, if they had no snags. >> why aren't families allowed? >> well, at this point, at the very first, we had very first case, we had a false i.d. and a lot of these people are hard to recognize, not to talk in a negative vain, but a lot have injuries, at the very least, a lot have blood on their
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face, they don't look like they used to look. the very first case we had a false i.d., and from that point on we decided the federal government actually recommends that you do full testing on the individuals, get dental exam, match them with records, just to make sure we give the ride body to the family the families will be notified somehow after the identity is made? >> that's right. and we are starting to make identities. the families come into the family center, bring all of the records that they have. they're immediately inputted into the system. the morgue, as the individuals go through, they input that information into the system and it's working well thus far to match individuals that we have with the reports we have from the families. >> quickly i want to ask you, last hour our correspondent brian todd pointed out he had the list of the missing people and there was one person who was listed twice on that list.
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so how are officials going about making sure that there aren't duplications like this? >> well we not working off of their list. we just go through and we inventory bodies, personal effects, give them a number on that bag, and then take the information on the bag and take it through the line that the federal government set up for identification. we won't -- if they have two people on the list, we won't have two people on our list. >> has your morgue still been receiving victims, even today? >> i understand that overnight -- i haven't had time to get over there today -- but i understand there were a few more people brought in. until i get to the morgue, i wouldn't have an exact number. >> mr. bridges, we hope ythank r clearing that up. find out more on how you can help those devastated by the tornadoes, go to cnn.com/impact.
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right there you'll find all of the organizations and many ways that you can help those in need. once again, cnn.com/impact. a trend in crime that's baffling even the most experienced experts. the breakdown on what has criminologists dumbfounded.
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chad myers is here to tell
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us about severe weather moving east. >> right now. and a tornado watch in northern vermont. okay? >> what? >> i know i know the end of the world was supposed to happen last weekend but it blows me away about the weather's moving into parts of tennessee, also west virginia. there's atlanta, georgia, a couple storms to the north, also to the wet of the city and gadston and aniston. from montgomery, mobile, tornado to the east of hattiesburg. some of the storms can rotate and not rotate enough to put a tornado down. the weather service can't take that chance and say we've got a rotate, we better put a warning out. moving into charleston, in the next hour or so showers near cincinnati. there's the weather. the tornado. another watch, cell north of syracuse, all of the weather near burlington, i know jet streams, they move to the north and as jet streams move to the
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north so will severe weather. northern vermont? you're supposed to get maple syrup. >> it's ski country, not tornado land. >> in fact, what happens here, as the season goes on, all of our severe weather's been in here, except a couple of storms that went through tuscaloosa, the same weather pattern went into north carolina with the weather in raleigh, as the day and years and months go on, jet stream goes up and here and there can be tornados in edmonton, calgary, later in the season in september and october. back down the jet stream comes back down and severe weather season. >> cooler, let's go off the radar. >> we haven't been off the radar in a while. >> it has been a while. >> we only have been on the radar. >> right. take us off. give us a break. >> we play be going back up in space. >> really. >> the shuttle's going to stop -- >> not you. >> maybe. >> what do you know? >> i'll be 90 by the time it goes up. but spacecraft, multipurpose
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crew vehicle, is in the works, maybe. it's going to take four astronauts, six-month flight of the red plan net 2030. we have a while to work on it to perfect it. but it's a lot like the old apollo where it's going to splash down in the pacific. we're not going to land this thing anymore. they had problems trying to get things back, re-entry's a problem. it's a one-time up and down, splash. but if you go to mars one time you don't have to go back, do you? >> no. that's cool. 2030? >> bring a couple martians back down, we'll be in good shape. >> i'm marking it down. >> first test flight won't be until 2016. but it's something to look forward to from nasa. >> something to talk about for the next 20 years. >> if my career lasts that long. >> all right, chad. we hope so. thank you. time 25 after the hour. top stories, key provisions of the patriot act could expire at midnight if congress doesn't pass a four-year extension.
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caught up in procedural wrangling in the senate. it has to go before the house if senators managed to pass it. expiring provisions of the anti-terrorism law deal with roving wiretaps, tracking alleged lone wolf terrorists and allowing authorities to obtain any records they deem relevant to an investigation. the supreme court sides with arizona on a law punishing businesses that knowingly hire illegal immigrants. a 5-3 ruling, the justices rejected arguments that the arizona law steps on traditional federal oversight over immigration. challenges to a controversial law that would give people a greater role in arresting suspected illegal immigrants working their way through lower courts. a source says dominique strauss-kahn is living it up, living in luxury in a townhouse in new york's trendy tribeca neighborhood. he's under house arrest, awaiting his trial for raping a hotel maid. a real estate listing says the townhouse he's living in is nearly 7,000 square feet with rent listed at $60,000 a month.
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a far cry from the jail at rikers. you probably think crime rates are up, right? with the recession. well, it is actually down. we'll explain the story next. thing under the gas cap, thing... do you even have a name? well, it doesn't matter. because it's about to change. there's a cheaper, cleaner way to fuel up now. the volt plugs into any socket, and fuels up at home. sure it could use gas, but for most commutes you won't need much, if any.
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rates would go up. it would make sense, right? the fbi released data this week from more than 13,000 law enforcement agencies and that brings me to today's big breakdown. the exact opposite is happening. so we want you to take a look here. the number of violent crimes plunged last year to the lowest rate in nearly 40 years. look at robbery, that fell 9.5% last year, after a similar drop before that. and despite a miserable and devastating economic crisis, that's what has everybody puzzled. so, murder, yes, murder, down 4.4% nationwide. even take a look at this one, forcible rape, aggravated assault, dropped, too. look at the numbers. so did property crimes like burglary, car thefts and arson. criminologists say this trend is surprising, striking, and, yes, they also say it is remarkable. it's especially true in smalltowns with under 10,000 people where murders plummeted
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more than 25% last year in these small towns. we're all seemingly safe across the country except maybe, yeah, in new york city. in big cities with more than 1 million people, new york was the only city besides san antonio where violent crimes shot up last year. and the only place, besides philly, to have a rise in murders. crime experts explain this increase by pointing to the historic lows last year. new york's drop in crime over the last 20 years has far outpaced many other places. they say all we're doing now is playing catch-up. experts are having a harder time explaining this falling trend in crime across the u.s. by most accounts, economic hardships and lower incarceration rates should equal higher crime rates, but that's clearly not the case. in fact, this has many crime experts scratching their heads, mystified and rethinking existing crime theory. but we're just fine with that, thank you. we'll chalk it up to the good of
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mankind, yes. meanwhile, a controversial law that restricts collective bargaining has been put on hold♪ i was diagnosed with copd. i could not take a deep breath i noticed i was having trouble. climbing the stairs, working in the garden, painting. my doctor suggested spiriva right then. announcer: spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled maintenance treatment for copd, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. i love what it does. it opens up the airways. announcer: spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. stop taking spiriva and call your doctor right away if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, have vision changes or eye pain, or have problems passing urine. tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, problems passing urine, or an enlarged prostate, as these may worsen with spiriva. also, discuss the medicines you take, even eye drops. side effects include dry mouth, constipation, and trouble passing urine. it makes me breathe easier. i can't do everything i used to do. but there's a lot i can do that i was struggling with.
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announcer: ask your doctor if once-daily spiriva is right for you. personal pricing now on brakes. tell us what you want to pay. we do our best to make that work. deal! my money. my choice. my meineke. it is half past the hour. a look at stories you may have missed. day three of the casey anthony murder trial and the jurors heard from casey's dad, a key witness. the defense argues that george anthony sexually abused his daughter and saw his granddaughter, caylee, drown in a pool. prosecutors are arguing he knew nothing about caylee's death. two of casey anthony's ex-boyfriends returned to the stand today. when asked how casey was with caylee, one described her as an
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affectionate mother. several key anti-terror measures could expire at midnight, if congress is not able to pass a four-year extension. currently caught up in procedural wrangling in the senate and still has to go before the house, if senators manage to pass it. the expiring provisions deal with roving wiretaps tracking alleged lone wolf terrorists allowing authorities to obtain any records they deem relevant to an investigation. in joplin, missouri, authorities released a lit of the missing. the list includes 232 names which are being published on missouri's public safety department website. but the list only includes those whose families filled out a missing person report. some people on the missing list may be dead, and officials will work with families to identify them. death toll now stands at 125. dedealing aa blow to walker, a wisconsin judge struck down the state's controversial law that restricts collective bargaining for state workers. the judge ruled that legislators
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violated the state's open meetings law and failed to provide the public with enough notice before passing the measure. the ruling renders the law void, but this decision is not the end to the legal fight. the state supreme court is scheduled to hear arguments in june to determine whether it will consider the case. accused of masterminding the massacre of 8,000 people, former bosnian serb general ratko mladic is no longer a free man. the latest on his capture.
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the government other serbia capturing the man order, the worst massacre since world war ii.
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michael holmes. >> he's been on the run since, what, '95 indicted for genocide and a bunch of other things, including torture, organizing the rape of women as well. the big one, he oversaw the siege of sarajevo, for one, the big one was srebrenica. and that was in 1995, when his troops went in and basically, well, literally massacred between 6,000 and 8,000 bosnian muslim men and boys. the other thing that made this worse, the srebrenica declared a u.n. safe haven. people were meant to be safe there. there was a dutch u.n. contingent there, very small, very lightly armed, and basically overrun. his men went in and butchered people. there's all kinds of evidence. there's video evidence of this happening. that's one of the videos there. it doesn't end well. >> where has he been? do they know for last 15 years? >> the thing is, there's a
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fringe, a nationalist fringe in serbia that supports him and thinks he was a patriot and only looking after the interests of serbia, and so he's had friends who have been looking after him all of this time. there are reports of him on ski fields, reports of him going to relatives' birthday parties and kristinings and stuff like that. it ended up he was caught in a village only 50 kilometers from the capital. again, hiding in plain sight. >> sounds similar, i was going to say, boy, sounds really similar to somebody else. >> people think that the only reason they moved on him was some seriousness was the fact not turning him over has been keeping serbia out of the process of getting into the european union. >> yemen, more violence there against the government. >> we've talked about this before. >> we talk about it every day. >> how this could have gone -- the worst thing that could happen continue becomes a full-on civil war. it's on the brink of that now. you've have got tribes that turned against the government,
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other tribes getting involved. those tribes don't necessarily get along with each other either. far from having a nice easy transition of power to some sort of opposition that everyone agrees to, no, you've got here fighting on the streets and outside of the capital as well. this could go even worse very, very quickly. at least 28 people killed in explosion that took place at a weapons storage site. been in power 3 ye3 years, 3 ti turned down a deal negotiated. >> is that why there's an uptick in violence? they're frustrated. >> they just won't go. even the u.s., because of course sell la has been an ally against al qaeda in yemen the u.s. held off saying he should go which people thought made it him keep on going. they're looking at putting sanctions and going through channels to put pressure on him
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to get out. if this goes full-on civil war, you could end up with the militants running the country. >> i want to ask you, does he have any reason to go? if he looks at what happened in egypt with mubarak, in libya, i mean, you know, there's no great outcome for him. >> there's no reason -- he's done, in much of the way gadhafi's godone. we've seen the last of the middle east and north african dictators who were going to go quietly. >> michael, very interesting stuff. >> good to see you. >> good to see you on this thursday as well. two opinionated commentators get into a verbal war of words and one gets suspended for using the "s" word. we'll plain. male announce] in 2011, at&t is at work, building up our wireless network all across america. we're adding new cell sites... increasing network capacity, and investing billions of dollars to improve your wireless network experience.
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some heated words by msnbc host ed schultz lands him in big trouble. msnbc suspended the host for a week. listen to what schultz says about laura ingram. >> what are the republicans thinking about? they're not thinking about their next door neighbor. they're just thinking about how much this is going to cost. president obama is going to be visiting joplin, missouri, on sunday. you know what they're talking about? like this right-wing slut,
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what's her name, laura ingra ham? yeah, she's a talk slut. >> shultingram slammed the pres on fox news for touring ireland while tornadoes were devastating the u.s. she accused of obama being disconnected and tone deaf. let's bring in howard kurtz, he joins me now from d.c. howard, schultz come out, apologized to ingram appaologiig for vile and inappropriate language. he offered to take himself off msnbc for an indefinite period of time without pay. what's your take on this? >> well, i think he was lucky, to get away with just being off the air for one week. a lot of broadcasters might have lost their jobs by saying something so stupid, offensive and i agree with ed schultz, it was vile and offensive. i give him credit for apologizing and msnbc for moving
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quickly and not letting this fester. >> he he says he's embarrassed himself, his family. ingram says her relationship with schultz, how would you describe it? >> nonexistent after this point. she's a conservative who works for fox and has her own radio show and ed shultchultz is a passionate labiberal who works r msnbc. but to go into the gutter with that language is hard to understand. i have to tell you, this is not the first time that ed schultz talked his way into trouble. msnb dr. management talked to him about toning things down because he's been personal in calling, for example, new jersey governor chris christie a fat slob, refers to -- he used to have psycho talk, msnbc got rid of that. he knows power of words to wound. he has gone over the line in the past, never like this. this is the worst thing he's ever said, by his own admission.
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>> when you hear the word slut, there are mixed interpretations about the word. >> well, i think that it is a word that stings in -- it's a word certainly you would never reply to a man. sometimes we say you're a media whore, you'll go on anything, when you say a right-wing slut it's a sexually derogatory term. schultz is smart not to try to defend it he realizes what he did. that was a very emotional and full throated apology that he delivered and he had to deliver on the air. i give him credit for that. but this is a guy who makes his libbing broadcasting every day on the radio, on television. he should know better. and as i say, other people, don imus comes to mind have lost their jobs over slurs like this.
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>> sarah palin tweeted saying keeping it classy, eddie. would you expect that others are going to be weighing in here or will this be the end of it? >> i think that schultz and msnbc probably contained the damage by agreeing to the suspension and having the full apology, but, sure, people who don't like what ed schultz have to say are going to beat him up over this, it will reverberate over the blogosphere but he asked for. this is a totally self-inflected wound. >> howard kurtz, appreciate you weighing in, as always, thank you. how would you feel if i told you there was a loophole that allows for easier purchases of high-powered weapons and avoids background checks? [ male announcer ] look at this,
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machine guns, short-barreled rifles and grenades not your typical weapons. these are title ii weapons and for each title ii purchase a person must submit photos and fingerprints for a background check, even if checks come back clear. a local official like a sheriff for district attorney weighs in on the purchase. even after passing the initial check the purchase can be denied. however, there is a way around
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this. if you set up a certain type of trust you can avoid the normal precautions, like a background check and get your weapon. the executive director of the national firearms act trade and collectors association, jay tom morgan the former dae for de kalb county here in georgia. jeff, i want to start with you. tell me why these trusts did be a good idea, as you say. >> there are several reasons that trusts and corporations are used in the purchase of nfa weapons or title ii weapons. most is to provide for things like probate issues and transfer of the weapons in the event that a succession issue takes place. >> so you have no problem, then, jeff, with the trusts themselves? what about the lack of a background check that come as long with setting up one of these and going about it this way to get your firearm? >> well, it is a bit troubling. i'd like to actually point out
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the chief law enforcement officers that you talked about earlier do not have the ability to either approve or reject an application. they have the ability to either sign or not sign the application. once they have signed the application to purchase one of these weapons, it is then that the background check occurs with the fbi. and interestingly enough, when a chief law enforcement officer chooses to not sign the politic for this weapon, what winds up happening is, is that people go ahead and set up a trust and net effect of it is a background check never takes place because the chief law enforcement officer didn't sign the form. >> got it. jay tom, i want to bring you in. you were a d.a., and it was your job to review the applications for title ii weapons. did you approve any? if so, what was the circumstance? >> only once in 1 ye2 years did make an approval, a business
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owner has large sums of cash every evening they needed three blocks to the bank so i made the approve of the title ii weapon. we're not talking about shotguns and deer rifles, talking about large caliber, high-powerful, automatic and semiautomatic weapons, which we need checks and balances on. >> from what i read, this includes rockets and silencers and all kinds of stuff. you were in atlanta, would you have ruled differently if you were in, say, idaho or montana? >> that's one of the problems. in urban area, i have a constituency to protect and i had no qualms about denying and not signing off on these applications. also, i disagree. few people are going to hire a lawyer and go to the trouble of getting a trust if you deny signing applications. in some areas the prosecutor would be under a lot of pressure to sign applications and it's why we need uniformity nationwide and not on a prosecutor or sheriff by sheriff
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basis. >> jeff, there are so many local law enforcement officers around the country with the power to veto purchases. you get many different opinions. do you think there should be one uniform federal standard? >> well, it's interesting. again, you just said that the sheriff or the chief law enforcement officer has the power to veto this purchase. there is no power of the sheriff to veto the purchase. in 1934 of the national firearms act it was put into law. the only situation that was given to the chief law enforcement officers was to offer information if they had it available that that user or that purchaser shouldn't own the weapon and today's age -- >> should there be a federal standard? >> but there is. right now if that form is signed, a uniformed federal investigation conducted by the fbi is conduct on that purchaser
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and it comes back either approved or not approved, depending upon what the fbi finds out. and that includes whether on the weapon is legal for ownership in a given locality or state. >> j. tom, you want to weigh in here. >> talking about sem man tibs here. you cannot get that weapons unless the chief law enforcement officer or prosecutor signs off on it. that's why we need a uniformed standard. >> what is your greatest concern? if these weapons are out there, what is your greatest fear? >> these weapons get in the hands of persons such as terrorists, such as gang leaders, drug dealers, these, as i said are not the type of weapons that most persons in our society would want to have. if anyone has one of these, we need to know who they are, where they are, what they are doing with these weapons. >> j. tom, jeff, we'll leave it there. thank you both for weighing in. sarah palin is launching a multicity tour but is it too late for her to raise money she
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would need to run for president? paul steinhauser will break it down for us. it's pretty revolutionary. patented, actually. it takes a snapshot of your good driving habits, so you can save money. like a snapshot? that's what i'm talking about. in a sports car. show it to me. yes! i want to believe it! ooh! fierce! argh! love it. i think we have it. the snapshot discount. new, huge, and only from progressive. the count on chevy event is here. your ticket to a cruze eco. 42 mpg and over 500 highway miles a tank. one of our 9 models over 30 mpg highway. fuel up, rock on. very well qualified lessees can get a low mileage lease on a chevy cruze eco for around $159 a month. or qualified buyers can get no monthly payments for 3 months. fuel economy based on epa estimates. deferred payments offer ends may 31st.
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her morning begins with artitis pain. wireless puts the world at your command. that's a cofe and two s. . back to sore knees. back to moreills. the day one but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. st 2il can keep arthritis pain awaall day fewerillshan tylenol. th is laraho chose 2leve anfewells r day free opain. and get the all day pain relief ofleven liquid gels. time for cnnpoliticle update. paul steinhauser joins me from washington. paul, breaking news on the sarah palin for president front. what's going on? >> randi, remember 24 hours ago, we were talking whether she was thinking more about running for the white house? yes, here than breaking news that we had an hour ago. she is launching a national bus
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tour. it's going to kick off here in washington, d.c., this sunday, during the memorial day celebrations. if you go to sara pac it's a one-nation tour. it's going to start in washington, go up the east coast, hit the historic sites. this is just the latest of a lot of hints from her. a couple days ago she still had fire in her belly when it came to running for the white house. we've confirmed that she's rehired two political advisers and learned and confirmed she launched that pro-palin movie that will premiere, where else, iowa. she's buying a house in arizona. why that is important? you don't have to be rand mcnally it's easier to campaign across the u.s. from arizona than alaska. hints that she's thinking of running for the white house more than she was a couple of weeks ago. >> arizona, a strategic location. tell me where she stands in the polls. >> brand new poll out today from the gallup organization, this is a republican and independents who would vote in the republican

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